IoT Hub Scaling

When you work with Azure IoT Hub, it is not always easy to tell what will happen when you reach the limits of IoT Hub and what to do when you reach those limits. As a reminder, recall that the scale of IoT Hub is defined by its tier and the number of units in the tier. There are three paying tiers, besides the free tier:

image

Although these tiers make it clear how many messages you can send, other limits such as the amount of messages per second cannot be seen here. To have an idea about the amount of messages you can send and the sustained throughput see https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/iot-hub-scaling/#device-to-cloud-and-cloud-to-device-message-throughput

The specific burst performance numbers can be found here: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/iot-hub-devguide-quotas-throttling/. Typically, the limit you are concerned with is the amount of device-to-cloud sends which are as follows:

  • S1: 12/sec/unit (but you get at least 100/sec in total; not per unit obviously); 10 units give you 120/sec and not 100+120/sec
  • S2: 120/sec/unit
  • S3: 6000/sec/unit

Now suppose you think about deploying 300 devices which send data every half a second. What tier should you use and how many units? It is clear that you need to send 600 messages per second so 5 units of S2 will suffice. You could also take 50 units of S1 for the same performance and price. With 5 units of S2 though, you can send more messages.

Now it would be nice to test the above in advance. At ThingTank we use Docker containers for this and we schedule them with Rancher, a great and easy to use Docker orchestration tool. If you want to try it, just use the container you can find on Docker Hub or the new Docker Store (still in beta). Just search for gbaeke and you will find the following container:

image

If you want to check out the code (warning: written hastily!), you can find it on GitHub here: https://github.com/xyloscloudservices/docker-itproceed. It is a simple NodeJs script that uses the Azure IoT Hub libraries to create a new device in the registry with a GUID for the name. Afterwards, the code sends a simple JSON payload to IoT Hub every half a second.

To use the script, start it as follows with three parameters:

app.js IoT_Hub_Short_Name IoT_Hub_Connection_String millis

Note: the millis parameter is the amount of milliseconds to wait between each send

Now you can run the containers in Rancher (for instance). I won’t go into the details how to add Docker Hosts to Rancher and how to create a new Stack (as they call it). Alternatively, you can run the containers on Azure Container Service or similar solutions.

In the PowerBI chart below, you see the eventcount every five seconds which is around 420-440 events which is a bit lower than expected for one S1 unit:

image

Note: the spike you see happens after the launch of 300 containers; throttling quickly kicks in

When switched to 5 S2 units, the graph looks as follows:

image

You see the eventcount jump to 3000 (near the end) which is what you would expect (300 containers send 600 messages per second = 3000 messages per 5 seconds which is possible with 5 S2 units that deliver 120 messages/sec/unit)

You really need to think if you want to send data every half a second or second. For our ThingTank Air Quality solution, we take measurements every second but aggregate them over a minute at the edge. Sending every minute with 5 S2 units would amount to thousands of devices before you reach the limits of IoT Hub!

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