Creating and containerizing a TensorFlow Go application

In an earlier post, I discussed using a TensorFlow model from a Go application. With the TensorFlow bindings for Go, you can load a model that was exported with TensorFlow’s SavedModelBuilder module. That module saves a “snapshot” of a trained model which can be used for inference.

In this post, we will actually use the model in a web application. The application presents the user with a page to upload an image:

The upload page

The class and its probability is displayed, including the processed image:

Clearly a hen!

The source code of the application can be found at https://github.com/gbaeke/nasnet-go. If you just want to try the application, use Docker and issue the following command (replace port 80 with another port if there is a conflict):

docker run -p 80:9090 -d gbaeke/nasnet

The image is around 2.55GB in size so be patient when you first run the application. When the container has started, open your browser at http://localhost to see the upload page.

To quickly try it, you can run the container on Azure Container Instances. If you use the Portal, specify port 9090 as the container port.

Nasnet container in ACI

A closer look at the appN

**UPDATE**: since first publication, the http handler code was moved into from main.go to handlers/handlers.go

In the init() function, the nasnet model is loaded with tf.LoadSavedModel. The ImageNet categories are also loaded with a call to getCategories() and stored in categories which is a map of int to a string array.

In main(), we simply print the TensorFlow version (1.12). Next, http.HandleFunc is used to setup a handler (upload func) when users connect to the root of the web app.

Naturally, most of the logic is in the upload function. In summary, it does the following:

  • when users just navigate to the page (HTTP GET verb), render the upload.gtpl template; that template contains the upload form and uses a bit of bootstrap to make it just a bit better looking (and that’s already an overstatement); to learn more about Go web templates, see this link.
  • when users submit a file (POST), the following happens:
    • read the image
    • convert the image to a tensor with the getTensor function; getTensor returns a *tf.Tensor; the tensor is created from a [1][224][224][3] array; note that each pixel value gets normalized by subtracting by 127.5 and then dividing by 127.5 which is the same preprocessing applied as in Keras (divide by 127.5 and subtract 1)
    • run a session by inputting the tensor and getting the categories and probabilities as output
    • look for the highest probability and save it, together with the category name in a variable of type ResultPageData (a struct)
    • the struct data is used as input for the response.gtpl template

Note that the image is also shown in the output. The processed image (resized to 224×224) gets converted to a base64-encoded string. That string can be used in HTML image rendering as follows (where {{.Picture}} in the template will be replaced by the encoded string):

 <img src="data:image/jpg;base64,{{.Picture}}"> 

Note that the application lacks sufficient error checking to gracefully handle the upload of non-image files. Maybe I’ll add that later! 😉

Containerization

To containerize the application, I used the Dockerfile from https://github.com/tinrab/go-tensorflow-image-recognition but removed the step that downloads the InceptionV3 model. My application contains a ready to use NasnetMobile model.

The container image is based on tensorflow/tensorflow:1.12.0. It is further modified as required with the TensorFlow C API and the installation of Go. As discussed earlier, I uploaded a working image on Docker Hub.

Conclusion

Once you know how to use TensorFlow models from Go applications, it is easy to embed them in any application, from command-line tools to APIs to web applications. Although this application does server-side processing, you can also use a model directly in the browser with TensorFlow.js or ONNX.js. For ONNX, try https://microsoft.github.io/onnxjs-demo/#/resnet50 to perform image classification with ResNet50 in the browser. You will notice that it will take a while to get started due to the model being downloaded. Once the model is downloaded, you can start classifying images. Personally, I prefer the server-side approach but it all depends on the scenario.

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