A first look at Rancher Rio

As explained on https://github.com/rancher/rio, Rancher Rio is a MicroPaaS that can be layered on top of any standard Kubernetes cluster. It makes it easier to deploy, scale, version and expose services. In this post, we will take a quick look at some of its basic capabilities.

To follow along, make sure you have a Kubernetes cluster running. I deployed a standard AKS cluster with three nodes. In your shell (I used Ubuntu Bash on Windows), install Rio:

curl -sfL https://get.rio.io | sh - 

After installation, check the version of Rio with:

rio --version
rio version v0.1.1-rc1 (cdb75cf1)

With v0.1.1 there was an issue with deploying the registry component. v0.1.1-rc1 fixes that.

Make sure you have kubectl installed and that its context points to the cluster in which you want to deploy Rio. If that is the case, just run the following command:

rio install

The above command will install a bunch of components in the rio-system namespace. After a while, running kubectl get po -n rio-system should show the list below:

Rio installed

Rio will install Istio and expose a service mesh gateway via a service of type load balancer. With AKS, this will result in an Azure load balancer that sends traffic to the service mesh gateway. When you deploy Rio services, you can automatically get a DNS name that will resolve to the external IP of the Azure load balancer.

Let’s install such a Rio service. We will use the following application: https://github.com/gbaeke/realtime-go. Instead of the master branch, we will deploy the httponly branch. The repo contains a Dockerfile with a two-stage build that results in a web application that displays messages published to redis in real time. Before we deploy the application, deploy redis with the following command:

kubectl run redis --image redis --port 6379 --expose

Now deploy the realtime-go app with Rio:

rio run -p 8080/http -n realtime --build-branch httponly --env REDISHOST=redis:6379 https://github.com/gbaeke/realtime-go.git

Rio makes it easy to deploy the application because it will pull the specified branch of the git repo and build the container image based on the Dockerfile. The above command also sets an environment variable that is used by the realtime-go code to find the redis host.

When the build is finished, the image is stored in the internal registry. You can check builds with rio builds. Get the build logs with rio build logs imagename. For example:

rio build logs default/realtime:7acdc6dfed59c1b93f2def1a84376a880aac9f5d

The result would be something like:

build logs

The rio run command results in a deployed service. Run rio ps to check this:

rio ps displays the deployed service

Notice that you also get a URL which is publicly accessible over SSL via a Let’s Encrypt certificate:

Application on public endpoint using a staging Let’s Encrypt cert

Just for fun, you can publish a message to the redis channel that this app checks for:

kubectl exec -it redis-pod /bin/sh
redis-cli
127.0.0.1:6379> publish device01 Hello

The above commands should display the message in the web app:

Great success!!!

To check the logs of the deployed service, run rio logs servicename. The result should be:

Logs from the realtime-go service

When you run rio –system ps you will see the rio system services. One of the services is Grafana, which contains Istio dashboards. Grab the URL of that service to access the dashboards:

One of the Istio dashboards

Even in this early version, Rio works quite well. It is very simple to install and it takes the grunt work out of deploying services on Kubernetes. Going from source code repository to a published service is just a single command, which is a bit similar to OpenShift. Highly recommended to give it a go when you have some time!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s