Microsoft Face API with a local container

A few days ago, I obtained access to the Face container. It provides access to the Face API via a container you can run where you want: on your pc, at the network edge or in your datacenter. You should allocate 6 GB or RAM and 2 cores for the container to run well. Note that you still need to create a Face API resource in the Azure Portal. The container needs to be associated with the Azure Face API via the endpoint and access key:

Face API with a West Europe (Amsterdam) endpoint

I used the Standard tier, which charges 0.84 euros per 1000 calls. As noted, the container will not function without associating it with an Azure Face API resource.

When you gain access to the container registry, you can pull the container:

docker pull containerpreview.azurecr.io/microsoft/cognitive-services-face:latest

After that, you can run the container as follows (for API billing endpoint in West Europe):

docker run --rm -it -p 5000:5000 --memory 6g --cpus 2 containerpreview.azurecr.io/microsoft/cognitive-services-face Eula=accept Billing=https://westeurope.api.cognitive.microsoft.com/face/v1.0 ApiKey=YOUR_API_KEY

The container will start. You will see the output (–it):

Running Face API container

And here’s the spec:

API spec Face API v1

Before showing how to use the detection feature, note that the container needs Internet access for billing purposes. You will not be able to run the container in fully offline scenarios.

Over at https://github.com/gbaeke/msface-go, you can find a simple example in Go that uses the container. The Face API can take a byte stream of an image or a URL to an image. The example takes the first approach and loads an image from disk as specified by the -image parameter. The resulting io.Reader is passed to the getFace function which does the actual call to the API (uri = http://localhost:5000/face/v1.0/detect):

request, err := http.NewRequest("POST", uri+"?returnFaceAttributes="+params, m)
request.Header.Add("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream")

// Send the request to the local web service
resp, err := client.Do(request)
if err != nil {
    return "", err
}

The response contains a Body attribute and that attribute is unmarshalled to a variable of type interface. That one is marshalled with indentation to a byte slice (b) which is returned by the function as a string:

var response interface{}
err = json.Unmarshal(respBody, &response)
if err != nil {
    return "", err
}
b, err := json.MarshalIndent(response, "", "\t")

Now you can use a picture like the one below:

Is he smiling?

Here are some parts of the input, following the command
detectface -image smiling.jpg

Emotion is clearly happiness with additional features such as age, gender, hair color, etc…

[
{
"faceAttributes": {
"accessories": [],
"age": 33,
"blur": {
"blurLevel": "high",
"value": 1
},
"emotion": {
"anger": 0,
"contempt": 0,
"disgust": 0,
"fear": 0,
"happiness": 1,
"neutral": 0,
"sadness": 0,
"surprise": 0
},
"exposure": {
"exposureLevel": "goodExposure",
"value": 0.71
},
"facialHair": {
"beard": 0.6,
"moustache": 0.6,
"sideburns": 0.6
},
"gender": "male",
"glasses": "NoGlasses",
"hair": {
"bald": 0.26,
"hairColor": [
{
"color": "black",
"confidence": 1
}],
"faceId": "b6d924c1-13ef-4d19-8bc9-34b0bb21f0ce",
"faceRectangle": {
"height": 1183,
"left": 944,
"top": 167,
"width": 1183
}
}
]

That’s it! Give the Face API container a go with the tool. You can get it here: https://github.com/gbaeke/msface-go/releases/tag/v0.0.1 (Windows)

Infrastructure as Code: exploring Pulumi

Image: from the Pulumi website

In my Twitter feed, I often come across Pulumi so I decided to try it out. Pulumi is an Infrastructure as Code solution that allows you to use familiar development languages such as JavaScript, Python and Go. The idea is that you define your infrastructure in the language that you prefer, versus some domain specific language. When ready, you merely use pulumi up to deploy your resources (and pulumi update, pulumi destroy, etc…). The screenshot below shows the deployment of an Azure resource group, storage account, file share and a container group on Azure Container Instances. The file share is mapped as a volume to one of the containers in the container group:

Deploying infrastructure with pulumi up

Installation is extremely straightforward. I chose to write the code in JavaScript as I had all the tools already installed on my Windows box. It is also more polished than the Go option (for now). I installed Pulumi per their instructions over at https://pulumi.io/quickstart/install.html.

Next, I used their cloud console to create a new project. Eventually, you will need to run a pulumi new command on your local machine. The cloud console will provide you with the command to use which is handy when you are just getting started. The cloud console provides a great overview of all your activities:

Nice and green (because I did not include the failed ones 😉)

In Resources, you can obtain a graph of the deployed resources:

Don’t you just love pretty graphs like this?

Let’s take a look at the code. The complete code is in the following gist: https://gist.github.com/gbaeke/30ae42dd10836881e7d5410743e4897c.

Resource group, storage account and share

The above code creates the resource group, storage account and file share. It is so straightforward that there is no need to explain it, especially if you know how it works with ARM. The simplicity of just referring to properties of resources you just created is awesome!

Next, we create a container group with two containers:

Creating the container group

If you have ever created a container group with a YAML file or ARM template, the above code will be very familiar. It defines a DNS label for the group and sets the type to Linux (ACI also supports Windows). Then two containers are added. The realtime-go container uses CertMagic to obtain Let’s Encrypt certificates. The certificates should be stored in persistent storage and that is what the Azure File Share is used for. It is mounted on /.local/share/certmagic because that is where the files will be placed in a scratch container.

I did run into a small issue with the container group. The realtime-go container should expose both port 80 and 443 but the port setting is a single numeric value. In YAML or ARM, multiple ports can be specified which makes total sense. Pulumi has another cross-cloud option to deploy containers which might do the trick.

All in all, I am pleasantly surprised with Pulumi. It’s definitely worth a more in-depth investigation!

Azure API Management Consumption Tier

In the previous post, I talked about a personal application I use to deploy Azure resources to my lab subscription. The architecture is pretty straightforward:

After obtaining an id token from Azure Active directory (v1 endpoint), API calls go to API Management with the token in the authorization HTTP header.

API Management is available in several tiers:

API Management tiers

The consumption tier, with its 1.000.000 free calls per month per Azure subscription naturally is the best fit for this application. I do not need virtual network support or multi-region support or even Active Directory support. And I don’t want the invoice either! 😉 Note that the lack of Active Directory support has nothing to do with the ability to verify the validity of a JWT (JSON Web Token).

I created an instance in West Europe but it gave me errors while adding operations (like POSTs or GETs). It complained about reaching the 1000 operations limit. Later, I created an instance in North Europe which had no issues.

Define a product

A product contains one or more APIs and has some configuration such as quotas. You can read up on API products here. You can also add policies at the product level. One example of a policy is a JWT check, which is exactly what I needed. Another example is adding basic authentication to the outgoing call:

Policies at the product level

The first policy, authentication, configures basic authentication and gets the password from the BasicAuthPassword named value:

Named values in API Management

The second policy is the JWT check. Here it is in full:

JWT Policy

The policy checks the validity of the JWT and returns a 401 error if invalid. The openid-config url points to a document that contains useful information to validate the JWT, including a pointer to the public keys that can be used to verify the JWT’s signature (https://login.microsoftonline.com/common/discovery/keys). Note that I also check for the name claim to match mine.

Note that Active Directory is also configured to only issue a token to me. This is done via Enterprise Applications in https://aad.portal.azure.com.

Creating the API

With this out of the way, let’s take a look at the API itself:

Azure Deploy API and its defined operations

The operations are not very RESTful but they do the trick since they are an exact match with the webhookd server’s endpoints.

To not end up with CORS errors, All Operations has a CORS policy defined:

CORS policy at the All operations level

Great! The front-end can now authenticate to Azure AD and call the API exposed by API management. Each call has the Azure AD token (a JWT) in the authorization header so API Management van verify the token’s validity and pass along the request to webhookd.

With the addition of the consumption tier, it makes sense to use API Management in many more cases. And not just for smaller apps like this one!

Azure Front Door in front of a static website

In the previous post, I wrote about hosting a simple static website on an Azure Storage Account. To enable a custom URL such as https://blog.baeke.info, you can add Azure CDN. If you use the Verizon Premium tier, you can configure rules such as a http to https redirect rule. This is similar to hosting static sites in an Amazon S3 bucket with Amazon CloudFront although it needs to be said that the http to https redirect is way simpler to configure there.

On Twitter, Karim Vaes reminded me of the Azure Front Door service, which is currently in preview. The tagline of the Azure Front Door service is clear: “scalable and secure entry point for fast delivery of your global applications”.

Azure Front Door Service Preview

The Front Door service is quite advanced and has features like global HTTP load balancing with instant failover, SSL offload, application acceleration and even application firewalling and DDoS protection. The price is lower that the Verizon Premium tier of Azure CDN. Please note that preview pricing is in effect at this moment.

Configuring a Front Door with the portal is very easy with the Front Door Designer. The screenshot below shows the designer for the same website as the previous post but for a different URL:

Front Door Designer

During deployment, you create a name that ends in azurefd.net (here geba.azurefd.net). Afterwards you can add a custom name like deploy.baeke.info in the above example. Similar to the Azure CDN, Front Door will give you a Digicert issued certificate if you enable HTTPS and choose Front Door managed:

Front Door managed SSL certificate

Naturally, the backend pool will refer to the https endpoint of the static website of your Azure Storage Account. I only have one such endpoint, but I could easily add another copy and start load balancing between the two.

In the routing rule, be sure you select the frontend host that matches the custom domain name you set up in the frontend hosts section:

Routing rule

It is still not as easy as in CloudFront to redirect http to https. For my needs, I can allow both http and https to Front Door and redirect in the browser:

if(window.location.href.substr(0,5) !== 'https'){
window.location.href = window.location.href.replace('http', 'https');
}

Not as clean as I would like it but it does the job for now. I can now access https://deploy.baeke.info via Front Door!

Using the Microsoft Face API to detect emotions in photos and video

In a previous post, I blogged about detecting emotions with the ONNX FER+ model. As an alternative, you can use cloud models hosted by major cloud providers such as Microsoft, Amazon and Google. Besides those, there are many other services to choose from.

To detect facial emotions with Azure, there is a Face API in two flavours:

  • Cloud: API calls are sent to a cloud-hosted endpoint in the selected deployment region
  • Container: API calls are sent to a container that you deploy anywhere, including the edge (e.g. IoT Edge device)

To use the container version, you need to request access via this link. In another blog post, I already used the Text Analytics container to detect sentiment in a piece of text.

Note that the container version is not free and needs to be configured with an API key. The API key is obtained by deploying the Face API in the cloud. Doing so generates a primary and secondary key. Be aware that the Face API container, like the Text Analytics container, needs connectivity to the cloud to ensure proper billing. It cannot be used in completely offline scenarios. In short, no matter the flavour you use, you need to deploy the Face API. It will appear in the portal as shown below:

Deployed Face API (part of Cognitive Services)

Using the API is a simple matter. An image can be delivered to the API in two ways:

  • Link: just provide a URL to an image
  • Octet-stream: POST binary data (the image’s bytes) to the API

In the Go example you can find on GitHub, the second approach is used. You simply open the image file (e.g. a jpg or png) and pass the byte array to the endpoint. The endpoint is in the following form for emotion detection:

https://westeurope.api.cognitive.microsoft.com/face/v1.0/detect?returnFaceAttributes=emotion

Instead of emotion, you can ask for other attributes or a combination of attributes: age, gender, headPose, smile, facialHair, glasses, emotion, hair, makeup, occlusion, accessories, blur, exposure and noise. You simply add them together with +’s (e.g. emotion+age+gender). When you add attributes, the cost per call will increase slightly as will the response time. With the additional attributes, the Face API is much more useful than the simple FER+ model. The Face API has several additional features such as storing and comparing faces. Check out the documentation for full details.

To detect emotion in a video, the sample at https://github.com/gbaeke/emotion/blob/master/main.go contains some commented out code in the import section and around line 100 so you can use the Face API via the github.com/gbaeke/emotion/faceapi/msface package’s GetEmotion() function instead of the GetEmotion() function in the code. Because we have the full webcam image and face in an OpenCV mat, some extra code is needed to serialize it to a byte stream in a format the Face API understands:

encodedImage, _ := gocv.IMEncode(gocv.JPEGFileExt, face)       
emotion, err = msface.GetEmotion(bytes.NewReader(encodedImage))

In the above example, the face region detected by OpenCV is encoded to a JPG format as a byte slice. The byte slice is simply converted to an io.Reader and handed to the GetEmotion() function in the msface package.

When you use the Face API to detect emotions in a video stream from a webcam (or a video file), you will be hitting the API quite hard. You will surely need the standard tier of the API which allows you to do 10 transactions per second. To add face and emotion detection to video, the solution discussed in Detecting Emotions in FER+ is a better option.

Detecting emotions with FER+

In an earlier post, I discussed classifying images with the ResNet50v2 model. Azure Machine Learning Service was used to create a container image that used the ONNX ResNet50v2 model and the ONNX Runtime for scoring.

Continuing on that theme, I created a container image that uses the ONNX FER+ model that can detect emotions in an image. The container image also uses the ONNX Runtime for scoring.

You might wonder why you would want to detect emotions this way when there are many services available that can do this for you with a simple API call! You could use Microsoft’s Face API or Amazon’s Rekognition for example. While those services are easy to use and provide additional features, they do come at a cost. If all you need is basic detection of emotions, using this FER+ container is sufficient and cost effective.

Azure Face API (image from Microsoft website)

A notebook to create the image and deploy a container to Azure Container Instances (ACI) can be found here. The notebook uses the Azure Machine Learning SDK to register the model to an Azure Machine Learning workspace, build a container image from that model and deploy the container to ACI. The scoring script score.py is shown below.

score.py

The model expects an 64×64 gray scale image of a face in an array with the following dimensions: [1][1][64][64]. The output is JSON with a results array that contains the probabilities for each emotion and a time field with the inference time.

The emotion probabilities are in this order:

0: "neutral", 1: "happy", 2: "surprise", 3: "sadness", 4: "anger", 5: "disgust", 6: "fear", 7: "contempt

To actually capture the emotions, I wrote a small demo program in Go that uses OpenCV (via GoCV). You can find it on GitHub: https://github.com/gbaeke/emotion. You will need to install OpenCV and GoCV. Find the instructions here: https://gocv.io/getting-started/linux/. There are similar instructions for Mac and Windows but I have not tried those

The program is still a little rough around the edges but it does the trick. The scoring URI is hard coded to http://localhost:5002/score. With Docker installed, use the following command to install the scoring container:

 docker run -d -p 5002:5001 gbaeke/onnxferplus

Have fun with it!

Deploying Azure Cognitive Services Containers with IoT Edge

Introduction

Azure Cognitive Services is a collection of APIs that make your applications smarter. Some of those APIs are listed below:

  • Vision: image classification, face detection (including emotions), OCR
  • Language: text analytics (e.g. key phrase or sentiment analysis), language detection and translation

To use one of the APIs you need to provision it in an Azure subscription. After provisioning, you will get an endpoint and API key. Every time you want to classify an image or detect sentiment in a piece of text, you will need to post an appropriate payload to the cloud endpoint and pass along the API key as well.

What if you want to use these services but you do not want to pass your payload to a cloud endpoint for compliance or latency reasons? In that case, the Cognitive Services containers can be used. In this post, we will take a look at the Text Analytics containers, specifically the one for Sentiment Analysis. Instead of deploying the container manually, we will deploy the container with IoT Edge.

IoT Edge Configuration

To get started, create an IoT Hub. The free tier will do just fine. When the IoT Hub is created, create an IoT Edge device. Next, configure your actual edge device to connect to IoT Hub with the connection string of the device you created in IoT Hub. Microsoft have a great tutorial to do all of the above, using a virtual machine in Azure as the edge device. The tutorial I linked to is the one for an edge device running Linux. When finished, the device should report its status to IoT Hub:

If you want to install IoT Edge on an existing device like a laptop, follow the procedure for Linux x64.

Once you have your edge device up and running, you can use the following command to obtain the status of your edge device: sudo systemctl status iotedge. The result:

Deploy Sentiment Analysis container

With the IoT Edge daemon up and running, we can deploy the Sentiment Analysis container. In IoT Hub, select your IoT Edge device and select Set modules:

In Set Modules you have the ability to configure the modules for this specific device. Modules are always deployed as containers and they do not have to be specifically designed or developed for use with IoT Edge. In the three step wizard, add the Sentiment Analysis container in the first step. Click Add and then select IoT Edge Module. Provide the following settings:

Although the container can freely be pulled from the Image URI, the container needs to be configured with billing info and an API key. In the Billing environment variable, specify the endpoint URL for the API you configured in the cloud. In ApiKey set your API key. Note that the container always needs to be connected to the cloud to verify that you are allowed to use the service. Remember that although your payload is not sent to the cloud, your container usage is. The full container create options are listed below:

{
"Env": [
"Eula=accept",
"Billing=https://westeurope.api.cognitive.microsoft.com/text/analytics/v2.0",
"ApiKey=<yourKEY>"
],
"HostConfig": {
"PortBindings": {
"5000/tcp": [
{
"HostPort": "5000"
}
]
}
}
}

In HostConfig we ask the container runtime (Docker) to map port 5000 of the container to port 5000 of the host. You can specify other create options as well.

On the next page, you can configure routing between IoT Edge modules. Because we do not use actual IoT Edge modules, leave the configuration as shown below:

Now move to the last page in the Set Modules wizard to review the configuration and click Submit.

Give the deployment some time to finish. After a while, check your edge device with the following command: sudo iotedge list. Your TextAnalytics container should be listed. Alternatively, use sudo docker ps to list the Docker containers on your edge device.

Testing the Sentiment Analysis container

If everything went well, you should be able to go to http://localhost:5000/swagger to see the available endpoints. Open Sentiment Analysis to try out a sample:

You can use curl to test as well:

curl -X POST "http://localhost:5000/text/analytics/v2.0/sentiment" -H  "accept: application/json" -H  "Content-Type: application/json-patch+json" -d "{  \"documents\": [    {      \"language\": \"en\",      \"id\": \"1\",      \"text\": \"I really really despise this product!! DO NOT BUY!!\"    }  ]}"

As you can see, the API expects a JSON payload with a documents array. Each document object has three fields: language, id and text. When you run the above command, the result is:

{"documents":[{"id":"1","score":0.0001703798770904541}],"errors":[]}

In this case, the text I really really despise this product!! DO NOT BUY!! clearly results in a very bad score. As you might have guessed, 0 is the absolute worst and 1 is the absolute best.

Just for fun, I created a small Go program to test the API:

The Go program can be found here: https://github.com/gbaeke/sentiment. You can download the executable for Linux with: wget https://github.com/gbaeke/sentiment/releases/download/v0.1/ta. Make ta executable and use ./ta –help for help with the parameters.

Summary

IoT Edge is a great way to deploy containers to edge devices running Linux or Windows. Besides deploying actual IoT Edge modules, you can deploy any container you want. In this post, we deployed a Cognitive Services container that does Sentiment Analysis at the edge.