A first look at Rancher Rio

As explained on https://github.com/rancher/rio, Rancher Rio is a MicroPaaS that can be layered on top of any standard Kubernetes cluster. It makes it easier to deploy, scale, version and expose services. In this post, we will take a quick look at some of its basic capabilities.

To follow along, make sure you have a Kubernetes cluster running. I deployed a standard AKS cluster with three nodes. In your shell (I used Ubuntu Bash on Windows), install Rio:

curl -sfL https://get.rio.io | sh - 

After installation, check the version of Rio with:

rio --version
rio version v0.1.1-rc1 (cdb75cf1)

With v0.1.1 there was an issue with deploying the registry component. v0.1.1-rc1 fixes that.

Make sure you have kubectl installed and that its context points to the cluster in which you want to deploy Rio. If that is the case, just run the following command:

rio install

The above command will install a bunch of components in the rio-system namespace. After a while, running kubectl get po -n rio-system should show the list below:

Rio installed

Rio will install Istio and expose a service mesh gateway via a service of type load balancer. With AKS, this will result in an Azure load balancer that sends traffic to the service mesh gateway. When you deploy Rio services, you can automatically get a DNS name that will resolve to the external IP of the Azure load balancer.

Let’s install such a Rio service. We will use the following application: https://github.com/gbaeke/realtime-go. Instead of the master branch, we will deploy the httponly branch. The repo contains a Dockerfile with a two-stage build that results in a web application that displays messages published to redis in real time. Before we deploy the application, deploy redis with the following command:

kubectl run redis --image redis --port 6379 --expose

Now deploy the realtime-go app with Rio:

rio run -p 8080/http -n realtime --build-branch httponly --env REDISHOST=redis:6379 https://github.com/gbaeke/realtime-go.git

Rio makes it easy to deploy the application because it will pull the specified branch of the git repo and build the container image based on the Dockerfile. The above command also sets an environment variable that is used by the realtime-go code to find the redis host.

When the build is finished, the image is stored in the internal registry. You can check builds with rio builds. Get the build logs with rio build logs imagename. For example:

rio build logs default/realtime:7acdc6dfed59c1b93f2def1a84376a880aac9f5d

The result would be something like:

build logs

The rio run command results in a deployed service. Run rio ps to check this:

rio ps displays the deployed service

Notice that you also get a URL which is publicly accessible over SSL via a Let’s Encrypt certificate:

Application on public endpoint using a staging Let’s Encrypt cert

Just for fun, you can publish a message to the redis channel that this app checks for:

kubectl exec -it redis-pod /bin/sh
redis-cli
127.0.0.1:6379> publish device01 Hello

The above commands should display the message in the web app:

Great success!!!

To check the logs of the deployed service, run rio logs servicename. The result should be:

Logs from the realtime-go service

When you run rio –system ps you will see the rio system services. One of the services is Grafana, which contains Istio dashboards. Grab the URL of that service to access the dashboards:

One of the Istio dashboards

Even in this early version, Rio works quite well. It is very simple to install and it takes the grunt work out of deploying services on Kubernetes. Going from source code repository to a published service is just a single command, which is a bit similar to OpenShift. Highly recommended to give it a go when you have some time!

Revisiting Rancher

Several years ago, when we started our first adventures in the wonderful world of IoT, we created an application for visualizing real-time streams of sensor data. The sensor data came from custom-built devices that used 2G for connectivity. IoT networks and protocols such as SigFox, NB-IoT or Lora were not mainstream at that time. We leveraged what were then new and often preview-level Azure services such as IoT Hub, Stream Analytics, etc… The architecture was loosely based on lambda architecture with a hot and cold path and stateful window-based stream processing. Fun stuff!

Kubernetes already existed but had not taken off yet. Managed Kubernetes services such as Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) weren’t a thing.

The application (end-user UI and management) was loosely based on a micro-services pattern and we decided to run the services as Docker containers. At that time, Karim Vaes, now a Program Manager for Azure Storage, worked at our company and was very enthusiastic about Rancher. , Rancher was still v1 and we decided to use it in combination with their own container orchestration framework called Cattle.

Our experience with Rancher was very positive. It was easy to deploy and run in production. The combination of GitHub, Shippable and the Rancher CLI made it extremely easy to deploy our code. Rancher, including Cattle, was very stable for our needs.

In recent years though, the growth of Kubernetes as a container orchestrator platform has far outpaced the others. Using an alternative orchestrator such as Cattle made less sense. Rancher 2.0 is now built around Kubernetes but maintains the same experience as earlier versions such as simple deployment and flexible configuration and management.

In this post, I will look at deploying Rancher 2.0 and importing an existing AKS cluster. This is a basic scenario but it allows you to get a feel for how it works. Indeed, besides deploying your cluster with Rancher from scratch (even on-premises on VMware), you can import existing Kubernetes clusters including managed clusters from Google, Amazon and Azure.

Installing Rancher

For evaluation purposes, it is best to just run Rancher on a single machine. I deployed an Azure virtual machine with the following properties:

  • Operating system: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  • Size: DS2v3 (2 vCPUs, 8GB of RAM)
  • Public IP with open ports 22, 80 and 443
  • DNS name: somename.westeurope.cloudapp.azure.com

In my personal DNS zone on CloudFlare, I created a CNAME record for the above DNS name. Later, when you install Rancher you can use the custom DNS name in combination with Let’s Encrypt support.

On the virtual machine, install Docker. Use the guide here. You can use the convenience script as a quick way to install Docker.

With Docker installed, install Rancher with the following command:

docker run -d --restart=unless-stopped -p 80:80 -p 443:443 \
rancher/rancher:latest --acme-domain your-custom-domain

More details about the single node installation can be found here. Note that Rancher uses etcd as a datastore. With the command above, the data will be in /var/lib/rancher inside the container. This is ok if you are just doing a test drive. In other cases, use external storage and mount it on /var/lib/rancher.

A single-node install is great for test and development. For production, use the HA install. This will actually run Rancher on Kubernetes. Rancher recommends a dedicated cluster in this scenario.

After installation, just connect https://your-custom-domain and provide a password for the default admin user.

Adding a cluster

To get started, I added an existing three-node AKS cluster to Rancher. After you add the cluster and turn on monitoring, you will see the following screen when you navigate to Clusters and select the imported cluster:

Dashboard for a cluster

To demonstrate the functionality, I deployed a 3-node cluster (1.11.9) with RBAC enabled and standard networking. After deployment, open up Azure Cloud shell and get your credentials:

az aks list -o table
az aks get-credentials -n cluster-name -g cluster-resource-group
kubectl cluster-info

The first command lists the clusters in your subscription, including their name and resource group. The second command configures kubectl, the Kubernetes command line admin tool, which is pre-installed in Azure Cloud Shell. To verify you are connected, the last command simply displays cluster information.

Now that the cluster is deployed, let’s try to import it. In Rancher, navigate to GlobalClusters and click Add Cluster:

Add cluster via Import

Click Import, type a name and click Create. You will get a screen with a command to run:

kubectl apply -f https://your-custom-dns/v3/import/somerandomtext.yaml

Back in the Azure Cloud Shell, run the command:

Running the command to prepare the cluster for import

Continue on in Rancher, the cluster will be added (by the components you deployed above):

Cluster appears in the list

Click on the cluster:

Top of the cluster dashboard

To see live metrics, you can click Enable Monitoring. This will install and configure Prometheus and Grafana. You can control several parameters of the deployment such as data retention:

Enabling monitoring

Notice that by default, persistent storage for Grafana and Prometheus is not configured.

Note: with monitoring enabled or not, you will notice the following error in the dashboard:

Controller manager and scheduler unhealthy?

The error is described here. In short, the components are probably healthy. The error is not related to a Rancher issue but an upstream Kubernetes issue.

When the monitoring API is ready, you will see live metrics and Grafana icons. Clicking on the Graphana icon next to Nodes gives you this:

Node monitoring with Prometheus and Grafana

Of course, Azure provides Container Insights for monitoring. The Grafana dashboards are richer though. On the other hand, querying and alerting on logs and metrics from Container Insights is powerful as well. You can of course enable them all and use the best of both worlds.

Conclusion

We briefly looked at Rancher 2.0 and how it can interact with a existing AKS cluster. An existing cluster is easy to add. Once it is added, adding monitoring is “easy peasy lemon squeezy” as my daughter would call it! 😉 As with Rancher 1.x, I am again pleasantly surprised at how Rancher is able to make complex matters simpler and more fun to work with. There is much more to explore and do of course. That’s for some follow-up posts!

IoT Hub Scaling

When you work with Azure IoT Hub, it is not always easy to tell what will happen when you reach the limits of IoT Hub and what to do when you reach those limits. As a reminder, recall that the scale of IoT Hub is defined by its tier and the number of units in the tier. There are three paying tiers, besides the free tier:

image

Although these tiers make it clear how many messages you can send, other limits such as the amount of messages per second cannot be seen here. To have an idea about the amount of messages you can send and the sustained throughput see https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/iot-hub-scaling/#device-to-cloud-and-cloud-to-device-message-throughput

The specific burst performance numbers can be found here: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/iot-hub-devguide-quotas-throttling/. Typically, the limit you are concerned with is the amount of device-to-cloud sends which are as follows:

  • S1: 12/sec/unit (but you get at least 100/sec in total; not per unit obviously); 10 units give you 120/sec and not 100+120/sec
  • S2: 120/sec/unit
  • S3: 6000/sec/unit

Now suppose you think about deploying 300 devices which send data every half a second. What tier should you use and how many units? It is clear that you need to send 600 messages per second so 5 units of S2 will suffice. You could also take 50 units of S1 for the same performance and price. With 5 units of S2 though, you can send more messages.

Now it would be nice to test the above in advance. At ThingTank we use Docker containers for this and we schedule them with Rancher, a great and easy to use Docker orchestration tool. If you want to try it, just use the container you can find on Docker Hub or the new Docker Store (still in beta). Just search for gbaeke and you will find the following container:

image

If you want to check out the code (warning: written hastily!), you can find it on GitHub here: https://github.com/xyloscloudservices/docker-itproceed. It is a simple NodeJs script that uses the Azure IoT Hub libraries to create a new device in the registry with a GUID for the name. Afterwards, the code sends a simple JSON payload to IoT Hub every half a second.

To use the script, start it as follows with three parameters:

app.js IoT_Hub_Short_Name IoT_Hub_Connection_String millis

Note: the millis parameter is the amount of milliseconds to wait between each send

Now you can run the containers in Rancher (for instance). I won’t go into the details how to add Docker Hosts to Rancher and how to create a new Stack (as they call it). Alternatively, you can run the containers on Azure Container Service or similar solutions.

In the PowerBI chart below, you see the eventcount every five seconds which is around 420-440 events which is a bit lower than expected for one S1 unit:

image

Note: the spike you see happens after the launch of 300 containers; throttling quickly kicks in

When switched to 5 S2 units, the graph looks as follows:

image

You see the eventcount jump to 3000 (near the end) which is what you would expect (300 containers send 600 messages per second = 3000 messages per 5 seconds which is possible with 5 S2 units that deliver 120 messages/sec/unit)

You really need to think if you want to send data every half a second or second. For our ThingTank Air Quality solution, we take measurements every second but aggregate them over a minute at the edge. Sending every minute with 5 S2 units would amount to thousands of devices before you reach the limits of IoT Hub!