DNS Options for Private Azure Kubernetes Service

When you deploy Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), by default the API server is publicly made available. That means it has a public IP address and an Azure-assigned name that’s resolvable by public DNS servers. To secure access, you can use authorized IP ranges.

As an alternative, you can deploy a private AKS cluster. That means the AKS API server gets an IP address in a private Azure virtual network. Most customers I work with use this option to comply with security policies. When you deploy a private AKS cluster, you still need a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) that resolves to the private IP address. There are several options you can use:

  • System (the default option): AKS creates a Private DNS Zone in the Node Resource Group; any virtual network that is linked to that Private DNS Zone can resolve the name; the virtual network used by AKS is automatically linked to the Private DNS Zone
  • None: default to public DNS; AKS creates a name for your cluster in a public DNS zone that resolves to the private IP address
  • Custom Private DNS Zone: AKS uses a Private DNS Zone that you or another team has created beforehand; this is mostly used in enterprise scenarios when the Private DNS Zones are integrated with custom DNS servers (e.g., on AD domain controllers, Infoblox, …)

The first two options, System and None, are discussed in the video below:

Overview of the 3 DNS options with a discussion of the first two: System and None

The third option, custom Private DNS Zone, is discussed in a separate video:

Private AKS with a custom Private DNS Zone

With the custom DNS option, you cannot use any name you like. The Private DNS Zone has to be like: privatelink.<region>.azmk8s.io. For instance, if you deploy your AKS cluster in West Europe, the Private DNS Zone’s name should be privatelink.westeurope.azmk8s.io. There is an option to use a subdomain as well.

When you use the custom DNS option, you also need to use a user-assigned Managed Identity for the AKS control plane. To make the registration of the A record in the Private DNS Zone work, in addition to linking the Private DNS Zone to the virtual network, the managed identity needs the following roles (at least):

  • Private DNS Zone Contributor role on the Private DNS Zone
  • Network Contributor role on the virtual network used by AKS

To deploy a private AKS cluster with a custom Private DNS Zone, you can use the following Azure CLI command which also sets the network plugin to azure (as an example). Private cluster also works with kubenet if you prefer that model. For other examples, see Create a private Azure Kubernetes Service cluster – Azure Kubernetes Service | Microsoft Docs.

az aks create \
    --resource-group RGNAME \
    --name aks-private \
    --network-plugin azure \
    --vnet-subnet-id "resourceId of AKS subnet" \
    --docker-bridge-address 172.17.0.1/16 \
    --dns-service-ip 10.3.0.10 \
    --service-cidr 10.3.0.0/24 \
    --enable-managed-identity \
    --assign-identity "resourceId of user-assigned managed identity" \
    --enable-private-cluster \
    --load-balancer-sku standard \
    --private-dns-zone "resourceId of Private DNS Zone"

The option that is easiest to use is the None option. You do not have to worry about Private DNS Zones and it just works. That option, at the time of this writing (June 2021) is still in preview and needs to be enabled on your subscription. In most cases though, I see enterprises go for the third option where the Private DNS Zones are created beforehand and integrated with custom DNS.

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